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[ Music, ] [, Music, ], [ Applause, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [ Applause, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ] Kelly; everything here: calm, [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [ Applause, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [, Music, ], [ Applause, ], [ Applause, ], [, Music, ] and everybody thanks for watching that video and welcome back to the cabin welcome back to the garden.

Just wanted to make a really quick clarification before anybody leaves this video and tries to do what I just did using fresh manure of any kind from any kind of animal is not recommended for a few reasons, and one especially, is equal.

I well you typically want to do is make sure that you compost manure for about 120 days so that it reaches a temperature that it's high enough to kill microorganisms that can be harmful to you. Now I'm, not doing that.

In this case, I don't know how old this moose manure is some of it. It's fairly fresh, like some of it was tracks that followed that came by the cabin just like a day previous or the night before, and then others like around the long hair was just some stuff that was at least a year old.

So I'm harvesting, a variety of ages, but what I'm doing with it is putting it directly and on the garden with those potatoes and I'm planting potatoes in it. The issue with that is that any harmful bacteria or other microorganisms can be in that still and can tank to the vegetables.

So two ways I'm getting around that one is to make sure that I'm planting. I'm using the manure on plants that I know I'm, going to leave in the ground for about 120 days, maybe closer to 90 days in case of the potatoes.

But I won't, be harvesting any of those as new potatoes as the small potatoes before they fully matured. Now. The other thing I'm doing as a precaution, is that I'm only using that fresher manure or the stuff.

I'm, not sure of the age of I'm on vegetables like potatoes, that I know I'm, going to be cooking up to at least a hundred and forty degrees for five minutes in order to kill any Harmful microorganisms on those vegetables, so in other words, I would not put fresh manure on something like leafy greens that, like salads, that you don't cook.

In fact, if you're, you know if you see the recalls, often for plants that have been contaminated, especially with e.coli. Typically, it's. Things like that that aren't that are eaten fresh and not wash properly so that's.

What I'm doing, but do your research on that please, don't follow of my example or my advice on how to to use things like manure check, with your the FDA or any other agency agriculture agency in your area, to See what they recommend our food protection agencies, so the other thing is that I plant the potatoes down along the stream like I did plant the other stuff last year.

Other stuff did not grow or didn't grow well, some of it germinated and some didn't. Even I'm thinking, and I didn & # 39. T really check it that closely that some of it probably rotted, because the soil is almost constantly wet for the first month or two until we start getting a drier summer and and the ground water had lowers.

But we'll, see I planted those potatoes and it was pretty wet. So I think what's likely going to happen is that they're going to rot before they sprout enough to start growing, with the roots being in constant contact with the with the water from the stream.

Now it's, a shame because it's, really really rich soil down there. All the lowlands typically like wetlands have a lot of nutrients, not only because they're lots of plants grow in those and then decompose, but also all the soil and composts and nutrients from the surrounding area.

Funneled down or washed out into these valleys and into the streams and then they, where they slow down in places like wetlands or slow-moving water like I have it settles, and you get this rich, thick rich bed of silt.

That's really high in nutrients, so the problem is up where I am is that it's very acidic, so it's, not great for growing. For that reason, I need to put a lot of potash or wood ash, so ash from my fireplaces on that to make it more suitable for growing unless I grow acid, loving plants like potatoes.

So I why I'm trying those this year down there like I said I'm, not expecting great success, but it's, a good trial, and I know that the proper way to grow in that area is to Do a raised bed on top of soyal, but how am I gonna get soil down there? It's, not easy to access, and it probably isn't worth my effort.

On the other hand, it is a probably good spot to do a google culture bed like I've done here behind me here and behind the garden B, that's, sort of behind the sauna, which is likely where I'm putting the greenhouse I started putting logs down there, so it's, basically going to be raised bed with all these rotting logs there here, and that would be perfect solution and go along that stream to raise that up.

Let it rot, let it become soil that's, not sitting right in the water and grow stuff. Still, that's suitable for that kind of bills, that acidity down there in the growing environment, but also and the moisture that's available that I don't have easily as accessible up on the higher land here.

But we'll, see I'll, see what I can do down there. It's that's. A long-term plan. I don't think it's, essential that I grow stuff down in that area now. The other thing is, I have some asparagus roots coming, not sure, hopefully the end of May or something that I can go pick them up.

But there are something that likes a city and I've seen them grow in areas like that. That have escaped backyards or gardens or of agricultural properties where the they become wild and thrive in these low wet acidic areas.

So I'm gonna try that, and I think it might work anyway, that's. What I wanted to just remind you over to give you these safety precautions before leaving the video, if you wanted to try something like this, it's, challenging growing stuff in an environment like this, I don't have easy access to Agricultural byproducts, like manure and straw, it's, an effort to get straw, and so I'm gonna continue just to utilize.

What I have here around me and try to get make this a real forest garden, where I'm, actually have sort of hacked a garden out of the forest, and now what can I use of all these natural products? That are that I'm blessed with all the wood, all the leaves of the soil on the other plants.

What a green manures can I grow successfully, so I don't have to bring in an animal manure. So these are the things I'm gonna be learning over the next couple years. That say: develop more of our food self-reliance, along with the fishing game and and wild edibles that were able to harvest here and speaking of hunting and fishing and wild edibles.

I did harvest one of the two turkeys that I'm allowed to hunt this year or to shoot this year. So if you're interested in that kind of thing, I think probably two or three days from now upload a short video on that hunt and how we're, utilizing the wild, turkey, food and otherwise.

So and if you're, not interested that I don't show much. It is youtube internet and I'm careful about what I show on camera and it's also extremely hard to film. This kind of thing on my own - I've, been gardening for years, but I'm, not an expert.

I'm, relentless though in my learning process and we're, trying to educate myself on everything. I'm doing now that I'm getting back into trying to grow all my own food. In addition to what I Forge hunted fish, I'm, going to learn as much as I can and keep trying out new things, and this forest gardening is new to me too, and when I just I got ta say I really love that and That I don't know it's, a deep connection with nature when you get to see these small things that you've nurtured, grow into something mature and edible in this case with vegetables - and I see with this Rain and the warm temperatures are getting the last couple of days starting to get some stuff sprouting on the Google culture Mountains.

So I'm thinking that by the end of the week, probably next week, next video we'll, be able to show you some plants growing up pretty good. You know we do have some starts in the cabin as well. At each of the windows is so congested in there.

I haven't been able to film much inside the cabin, so tomatoes lots of tomatoes, because we do a lot of tomato sauce and I'll, be happy hydrating Tomatoes as well. What else does pepper started in there? Cantaloupe, a bunch of herbs and stuff like that spinach, but a lot of that some of the stuff is, I'm going to get into the two Gardens get it covered over when we get Frost cuz, we are still probably a month away from Our last roast anyway interesting trying this stuff out and learning again and and becoming more self-reliant here on the homestead.

So thanks for following along, I hope you're learning, something from me or hope you're, enjoying at least uh being entertained by what we're doing here, the successes and the failures. So I'm gonna get back to work in the garden I & # 39.

Ve got a lot to do so, thanks for watching appreciate - and I look forward to seeing at the Kevin next time take care. [, Music ] ( country, music, ) (, ax, thwacking, ), ( bark crackling, ), (, ax tapping ), (, ax tapping ), ( ax, thwacking, ), (, ax tapping ) Come on.

, Hello, there pup., ( rake, scraping ) ( rake scraping ). Why do you have to walk through the garden Stay. ( rake scraping ) Get outta there, pup outta, the garden., ( birds, chirping ) ( leaves rustling ) ( water, rushing ), ( gentle guitar, music, ), ( water, lapping, ), ( bucket clattering ).

You can get into worse my dog. All right, buddy. ( rain, pattering ), ( birds, chirping ), (, ax, thudding, ), (, birds, chirping, ), Hey everybody, thanks for watching that video and welcome back to the cabin welcome back to the garden.

. Just wanted to make a really quick clarification before anybody leaves this video and tries to do what I just did.. Using fresh manure of any kind from any kind of animal is not recommended for a few reasons.

, And one especially, is E. coli.. What you typically wan na do is make sure that you compost manure for about 120 days so that it reaches a temperature that's high enough to kill microorganisms that can be harmful to you.

. I'm, not doing that in this case.. I don't know how old this moose manure is. Some of it is fairly fresh.. Some of it was tracks. I followed that came by the cabin just like a day previous or the night before, and then others like around the longhouse was some stuff that was at least a year old.

So I'm harvesting, a variety of ages, but what I'm doing with it is putting it directly on the garden with those potatoes and planting potatoes in it.. The issue with that is that any harmful bacteria or other microorganisms can be in that still and can taint the vegetables.

. So two ways I'm getting around that. One is to make sure that I'm planting. I'm using the manure on plants that I know I'm gonna leave in the ground for about 120 days., Maybe closer to 90 days in case of the potatoes, but I won't be harvesting any of Those as new potatoes as the small potatoes before they fully matured.

Now the other thing I'm. Doing as a precaution, is that I'm only using that fresher manure or the stuff. I'm, not sure of the age of on vegetables like potatoes, that I know I'm gonna be cooking up to at least 140 degrees for five minutes in order to kill any harmful microorganisms on those vegetables.

. So, in other words, I would not put fresh manure on something like leafy greens like salads, that you don't cook.. In fact, if you see the recalls, often for plants that have been contaminated, especially with E.

coli, typically, it's. Things like that that are eaten fresh and not washed properly., So that's. What I'm doing, but do your research on that., Please don't, follow my example or my advice on how to use things like manure.

Check with the FDA or any other agency agricultural agency in your area, to see what they Recommend or food protection agencies., So the other thing is that I plant the potatoes down along the stream like I did plant the other stuff.

Last year. Other stuff did not grow or it didn't grow well., Some of it germinated and some didn't even.. I'm thinking and I didn & # 39. T really check it that closely that some of it probably rotted, because the soil is almost constantly wet for the first month or two until we start getting a drier summer and the groundwater lowers.

. But we'll see.. I planted those potatoes and it was pretty wet. So I think what's likely going to happen is that they're going to rot before they sprout enough to start growing, with the roots being in constant contact with the water.

From the stream. Now it's, a shame because it's, really really rich soil down. There. All lowlands. Typically, like wetlands have a lot of nutrients, not only because lots of plants grow in those and then decompose, but also all the soil and compost and nutrients from the surrounding area funnel down or wash down into these valleys and into the streams where they slow down.

In places like wetlands or slow moving water, like I have., It settles, and you get this thick rich bed of silt, that's really high in nutrients.. So the problem is up where I am is that it's very acidic, so it's, not great for growing.

For that reason. I need to put a lot of pot ash or wood ash, so ash from my fireplaces on that to make it more suitable for growing. Unless I grow acid, loving plants like potatoes., So that's. Why? I'm trying those this year down.

There. Like I said I'm, not expecting great success, but it's. A good trial., And I know that the proper way to grow in that area is to do a raised. Bed on top of that soil, but how am I gonna get soil down there? It's, not easy to access, and it probably isn't worth my effort.

. On the other hand, it is probably a good spot to do a hugelkultur bed like I've done here behind me, here. And behind the garden that's, sort of behind the sauna, which is likely where I'm. Putting the greenhouse I started putting logs down there.

, So it's, basically going to be a raised bed with all these rotting logs. There here, and that would be a perfect solution to go along that stream to raise that up.. Let it rot! Let it become soil that's, not sitting right in the water and grow stuff, still that's suitable for that kind of that acidity down there and the growing environment.

, But also and the moisture that's available that I don't have easily as accessible up on the higher land here, but we'll see.. We'll, see what I can do down there. That's, a long term plan and I don't think it's, essential that I grow stuff down in that area.

Now. The other thing is, I have some asparagus roots, coming., Not sure, hopefully the end of May or something that I can go pick them up, but they're, something that likes acidity and I've seen them grow in areas like that.

That have escaped backyards or gardens or agricultural properties where they become wild and thrive in these low wet, acidic areas.. So I'm gonna try that.. I think it might work. Anyway, that's. What I wanted to just remind you of, or give you the safety precautions before leaving the video, if you wanted to try something like this.

It's, challenging growing stuff in an environment like this., I don't, have easy access to Agricultural byproducts, like manure and straw. It's. An effort to get straw in so I'm gonna continue just to utilize.

What I have here around me and try to get make this a real forest garden, where I actually sort of hack the garden out of the forest, and now what can I use of all these natural products that I'm blessed with All the Wood all the leaves all the soil and the other plants.

. What kind of green manures can I grow successfully? So I don't have to bring in an animal manure. So these are the things I'm gonna be learning over the next couple years, as I develop more of our food self-reliance, along with the fish and game and wild edibles, that we're able to harvest here.

And speaking of Hunting and fishing and wild edibles, I did harvest one of the two turkeys that I'm allowed to hunt this year or to shoot this year.. So if you're interested in that kind of thing, I think probably two or three days from now I'll upload, a short video on that hunt and how we're, utilizing the wild turkey.

Food and otherwise., And If you're, not interested in that I don't show much., It is YouTube and I'm careful about what I show on camera. And it's, also extremely hard to film. This kind of thing on my own.

( birds, chirping ), I've, been gardening for years, but I'm, not an expert.. I'm, relentless though in my learning process and trying to educate myself on everything I'm doing.. Now that I'm getting back into trying to grow all my own food.

In addition to what I forage hunt and fish, I'm, going to learn as much as I can and keep trying out new things, and this forest gardening is new to me. Too. I got ta say I really love that.. I don't know it's, a deep connection with nature when you get to see these small things that you've nurtured, grow into something mature and edible.

. In this case, with vegetables. - And I see with this rain and the warm temperatures we're getting in the last couple of days, starting to get some stuff sprouting on the hugelkultur mound. So I'm thinking that by the end of the week, probably next week, next video I'll - be able to show you some plants growing up pretty good.

. We do have some starts in the cabin as well, and each of the windows is so congested in there. I haven't been able to film much inside the cabin., So tomatoes, lots of tomatoes'cause. We do a lot of tomato sauce.

. I'll, be dehydrating tomatoes as well.. What else there's? Pepper start in there cantaloupe a bunch of herbs and stuff like that spinach. But a lot of that some of the stuff I'm gonna get into the two gardens and get it covered over when we get frost'cause.

We are still probably a month away from our last frost. Anyway interesting trying this stuff out and learning again and becoming more self-reliant here on the homestead.. So thanks for following along.

, I hope you're learning, something from me or hope. You're, enjoying at least being entertained by what we're, doing here. The successes and the failures.. So I'm gonna get back to work in the garden.

I & # 39. Ve got a lot to do so. Thanks for watching. I appreciate it and I look forward to seeing you at the cabin next time. Take care. ( birds, chirping ), (, water, trickling, ), (, loon, calling )

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